Getting Your Move On: Purging, Preparing, and Packing

Moving is high up on our stress lists, isn’t it? And it’s an inescapable part of life: Americans move an average of 11.7 times during their lifetimes. Just thinking about a move is overwhelming: there’s so much to do, and where to begin?  

At Org & Relo we specialize in relocations, and we love them. We handle everything from recommending and coordinating the movers to helping you de-clutter before you pack to unpacking and organizing your new space so that it works for you. I can’t tell you how much happiness and immediate satisfaction results for all of us at the end of a successful move! My clients especially love how stress-free a move with us can be. One of them recently said: “With the help of your company, the physical and emotional stress of our move was so minimal. There is something about uprooting that sends your brain into a whirl. I will never forget the end of our first day with you. We retired to our bedroom to find our bed made and all of our clothing neatly organized. It was such a "zen" moment and just what we needed.”

My best advice is that it’s never too early to start preparing for a move. Leaving it all to the last minute is stressful and taxing. You’ll just be flinging things in boxes, labeling them “misc.” (or not labeling them at all), and filling your new garage with a depressing hodge podge of stuff. Pre-move prep can make the current space you are living in calmer and less chaotic as the pressure of the move builds. 

Approach it methodically. Prior to packing, start purging your stuff. Why pay to pack it, pay to move it, pay to unload it, pay to unpack it, and pay to get rid of it? I know letting things go can be challenging, so maybe asking yourself my three magic questions might help:

  Do I use it?

  Do I love it?

  Do I appreciate it?

If you’re not getting a resounding “Yes!” to any of these then you know what your answer is--time to give away, donate, trash, or recycle. One way to reduce clutter at the outset is to be really careful about what you bring into your home. (True story: I pondered a slow cooker for two years before I took the plunge and bought it.) And any item of clothing that is invited into your closet should be adored as it was in the store, since that’s the mirror in which it always looks best. Avoid half-hearted purchases; those are the ones you’ll be wanting to get rid of before the year is out.

Another way to ease the letting go is to figure out where an item is headed. Gifting a box of beloved kids’ books to your sister for her new baby or passing on a great jacket you rarely wore to a girlfriend who always admired it can make a purging decision easier. Consigning is another great option, and Boulder’s own Clutter Consign is a fabulous place for much-loved treasures. Look up consignment stores in your area. Once you’ve decided to get rid of something, do yourself a favor and get it donated or recycled immediately--not stashed in a pile in the garage. The energy in your house will thank you... and so will your to-do list.

Stay ahead of the curve early on by pricing out moving supplies, or checking curb alerts on Craigslist for used boxes and paper. You can start packing long before move day arrives--low-rotation areas, like the linen closet, kids’ toys, sideboard items, books, etc. These boxes can be packed and stacked neatly in the garage to minimize the rush. Keep all the boxes for each destination (kitchen, basement, playroom, etc.) grouped together to make the loading and unloading more efficient. When packing boxes, labeling is key. Use a Sharpie to label the designated room in ALL CAPS on the same place on each box, and list what’s in it underneath. As the move approaches, pack up as much as you can before getting to the high-rotation rooms, like kitchen and bedroom, at the end.

A few other things to tackle ahead of time:

· Get move estimates from reputable moving companies (if you are moving between Memorial Day and Labor Day, moving companies are often overbooked).

· Think about what’s in the freezer and pantry, and plan meals around those items so you don’t have to pack or toss a lot of food.

· Contact us for a detailed list of what to do in the last few weeks like address changes, booking pet sitters, safely disposing of household chemicals, and more.

Closer to move day, you’ll want to pack (and label!) your “Essentials” boxes, such as sheets and towels, and make sure they’re last on the truck and first off. You’ll also pack suitcases with personal items like clothes and toiletries (this is also a good place for jewelry and important files) and transport them yourself.  Take anything you consider valuable with you.

 A move doesn’t have to be one of life’s great stressors. With a little planning, time, and attention, you can pull it off without a hitch.

 Happy Organizing!

 Sheryl